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Durant gains momentum throughout state



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Clark Durant shakes hands with golfing legend Arnold Palmer as they exit a sandtrap at theCountry Club of Detroit in 2004 during a charity event. For Palmer, it was a return to where hewon the 1954 U.S. Amateur title.

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Clark Durant makes his Sept. 23 announcement to run for U.S. Senate at Cornerstone Schools in Detroit. Durant said sharing it with the children and staff there was a great beginning to a long campaign.
December 08, 2011
The decision for Clark Durant wasn't his alone. It came during a family meeting late this past summer.

The four children of Grosse Pointe Farms residents Clark and Susan Durant were home for a wedding.

"My great children, with a wonderful daughter-in-law and wonderful son-in-law, we were gathered in a bedroom," Durant said. "We were having a lively conversation, bouncing thoughts from those sitting on the bed, the floor and around the room. I asked about a run for the U.S. Senate."


The answer, Durant said, came in a hurry from the youngest son John.

"He said, 'we love you very much,'" Durant said. "Then he pointed a finger at me. He said my generation, both Republicans and Democrats, have put our country at risk. He said it was a 30- to 40-year problem of being irresponsible. My family agreed it was time to help fix the problem. I learned at a young age if you make a mistake, you correct it."

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Clark Durant shakes hands with golfing legend Arnold Palmer as they exit a sandtrap at the Country Club of Detroit in 2004 during a charity event. For Palmer, it was a return to where he won the 1954 U.S. Amateur title.
With the support of his family first, Durant decided he would run for the position in the U.S. Senate held by Democrat Debbie Stabenow.

"The wonderful thing is we made the decision together," Durant said. "I've been married to Susan for 38 years. Having the support of my family is the only way I could do this."

Support quickly grew before an official announcement was made. Others had already entered the race, including former Congressman Pete Hoekstra, a Republican who lost the bid for governor to eventual winner Rick Snyder.

Hoekstra was seeking support from big names statewide, but Durant found success of his own, garnering the support of former state Republican chairs Betsy DeVos, Spence Abraham and Saul Anuzis. Abraham also served in the U.S. Senate.


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