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Ahee

Finding low-cost treatment for daughter's addiction


Health Point


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July 14, 2011
Dear Jeff and Debra:

We have a 32-year-old daughter who is addicted to heroin. We put her into treatment three years ago, but when she came home, she didn't follow the recovery plan her counselor created for her.

Needless to say, within about two months she was using again. She went to a doctor who gave her Vicodin for false claims of back pain. The prescription drugs led her right back to heroin.

Our daughter is now homeless. We won't let her in our house.

She got in touch with her sister, asking for help. As a family, we made an advanced decision that if she came looking for help, we would only give one answer: "We'll help, but only if help means long-term treatment."

Here's the problem. We spent a lot of money on her first treatment and we're not willing to do that again. At the same time, we want to make sure she gets the right help so she will succeed.

We love our daughter. Before her addiction, she was a wonderful girl.

Can you give us a suggestion for good treatment that won't cost a bundle?

- The Bank is Busted

Dear Busted:

Your thinking is correct. Your daughter's successful recovery from heroin addiction hinges on getting enough time in treatment.

We recommend 3 to 6 months of inpatient treatment followed by a minimum of 12 months in a transitional house for recovering women.

Underestimating what it takes to stay sober is a major reason alcoholics and addicts relapse.

Addiction isn't a lifestyle choice. It is a genetically based, chronic illness that requires working an ongoing program of recovery.

Much like a diabetic, an addict's sobriety is determined by what he or she does on a daily basis.

Your daughter will learn how to turn her life around while she is in treatment.

Once she's in transitional housing, she will live what she has learned.

She'll begin rebuilding her life by getting a job and once she's working, she can help pay for her stay.

Dawn Farm is a low-cost program. Located on a working farm in Ypsilanti, Dawn Farm offers the structure and time your daughter needs. The cost for each 30-day period is $2,700.

A free detox program in Ann Arbor is offered. T

ransitional housing ranges from $425 to $450 a month and your daughter can stay for up to 2 years.

For a tour, call (734) 485-8725 or visit dawnfarm.org.

Jeff Jay and Debra Jay are co- authors of "Love First," and Debra Jay is the author of "No More Letting Go: The Spirituality of Taking Action Against Alcoholism and Drug Addiction." The Jays are professional interventionists who live in Grosse Pointe Farms. They may be contacted at (313) 882-6921 or lovefirst.net.

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Jeff Jay and Debra Jay are the authors of "Love First: A New Approach to Intervention for Alcoholism and Drug Addiction," and Debra Jay is the author of "No More Letting Go: The Spirituality of Taking Action Against Alcoholism and Drug Addiction." Jeff and Debra Jay are professional interventionists who live in Grosse Pointe Farms. They may be contacted with your questions at (313) 882-6921 or at lovefirst.net.
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